This is a page for questions.

  1. What is the GradShow?
  2. Am I eligible to participate?
  3. What do I need to do to enter?
  4. What does a Visual/Performing Arts proposal submission look like?
  5. What does a Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship proposal submission look like?
  6. What does a scholarly poster look like?
  7. What if I have never made a scholarly poster in my discipline before?
  8. What are the dimensions for the posters?
  9. What are the main awards?
  10. What other awards are there?
  11. How does the judging work?
  12. Who are the judges?
  13. What are the judges looking for?
  14. What is a 3 minute talk?
  15. Where can I view my submission?
  16. Will I receive feedback or my score?
  17. Can I give an oral presentation of my Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship work?
  18. Will there be electric outlets for my work?
  19. What materials are provided for my work?
  20. Is there a limit to how many submissions I can enter?
  21. What if I have class during the times of the GradShow?
  22. Who can I direct questions to?

What is the GradShow?

The 2020 GradShow is a graduate conference at CSU that provides an opportunity for you as a graduate student to showcase your talents, connect with other graduate students, and enjoy the possibility of winning a scholarship award.

Am I eligible to participate?

If you are currently a graduate student at CSU, you are eligible to participate! We also welcome students who plan to graduate this Fall to participate. We encourage submissions that encompass all areas.

What do I need to do to enter?

Follow the directions on the website to submit your proposal. You will need to identify if your work is research-based or creative work. Early submission is advised - a limited number of proposals are accepted. Please e-mail the administrators if you have any questions.

What does a Visual/Performing Arts proposal submission look like?

Project Title: Limit of 10 words.

Project Abstract: Please write a short (limit 250 words), clear, concise project summary that includes the following: background information (explanatory information about your work and what it represents), significance of your work, and future directions.

What does a Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship proposal submission look like?

Project Title: Limit of 10 words.

Project Abstract: Please write a short (limit 250 words), clear, concise abstract that contains the following: purpose, procedure/description, results/outcomes, implications/future directions. If your project is in the beginning stages of the research process, please explain what you’ve completed thus far and what you expect your results and implications will be.

What does a scholarly poster look like?

Please check back for techinical details on how to create posters for the 2020 virtual format.

What if I have never made a scholarly poster in my discipline before?

No problem! Please contact Kaitlyn Reed and Allie Alayan at GradShow@colostate.edu. If there is enough interest within your department, they can host workshops and/or consultation services!

What are the dimensions for the posters?

Please check back for details on how to create posters for the 2020 virtual format.

What are the main awards?

All submitted research proposals and creative work will automatically be considered for awards in the general two areas of "Great Minds in Research" and "Distinction in Creativity," respectively. In addition, there will be awards for submissions in areas such as global impact and engineering. Many of the academic colleges are also sponsoring awards for their students.

When you sign up to participate, you will be asked if your proposal meets the criteria for several of the award(s), such as Global Impact. As noted above, all proposals will be considered for the general awards. These awards are based on your discipline so there is no need to indicate interest in being considered - you will be automatically entered for the general awards as well as your own college awards. Check out the awards page for information about the general awards and review last year’s winners! Awards values are subject to change and the value may be distributed as decided upon by the Graduate Student Showcase planning committee. Early submission is advised - a limited number of proposals are accepted.

What are the other awards?

When you sign up to participate, you will be asked if your proposal meets the criteria for several of the Global Impact Awards offered by the Office of International Programs. In addition, you may be considered for other awards based on the applicability of your work to each area of interest. Each awarding group sets the eligibility and judging criteria for their awards.

There are also many college-specific awards. You will be automatically entered for your own college awards. Judging criteria varying according to the college. Check out the awards page for information about the general awards and review last year’s winners!

How does the judging work?

Judging will be done remotely during the week of Nov. 16.

Because all submissions are eligible for either the "Distinction in Creativity" or "Great Minds in Research" you will have at least two judges review your submission, and possibly more. This is because there are a number of different groups of judging. For example, some awards such as the ones sponsored by CSU Ventures and the Alumni Association bring in additional judges for their award. The final number of judges that review your poster will ultimately depend on your eligibility for the various awards. Each poster/submission will be rated by a minimum of two judges.

Who are the judges?

Judges will consist of faculty members, post-doctoral fellows, staff, alumni and community members. As a reminder, judges are assigned randomly, so you can expect that your judges most likely are not individuals from your own field.

What are the judges looking for?

The judges have a rating sheet (rubric) that considers the following categories: Background/Introduction, Purpose, Design, Results/Outcomes, Conclusions, Impact, Poster Appearance/Layout, and Overall Impression.

In addition, the criteria for judging a project will include how well you can verbally explain your submission to the judges. 2020 GradShow presenters will create a recording of a 3 minute talk. Judges will likely be from outside your field of study, so it is important that you prepare a 3 minute talk that explains your project to a lay audience. Judges may reach out with questions or comments during the judging process.

What is a 3 minute talk?

A 3 minute talk is a compelling oration where you consolidate your ideas and crystalize the important aspects of your submission for a lay audience. 2020 Presenters will receive detailed instructions for creating a recording of their talk for judges to review. Make sure to include the significance of your work. Because your 3 minute talk is targeted for people outside your field, be careful about the professional jargon you use. Make sure to have appropriate language for everyone, and when needed, explain terminology that you include.

Overall, you want to make sure that what you say is comprehensive with rich content about your project. Present with an engaging manner, making it interesting for the other person.

You can review examples of 3 minute talks from CSU's VPR Fellowship Cohort awardees and the 3MT Showcase. You might note that these examples are from 3 minute competitions across the world. Although our format is a bit different, they still provide a good overview of how you might approach putting together you 3 minute explanation of your project for the GradShow.

Where can I view my submission?

If you want to view your submission, you can log back on to the GradShow submission page.

Will I know my score or be able to receive feedback?

No, unfortunately we are not able to provide individual feedback from the judges. Although we know that graduate students are often interested, and even focused on what they could do to improve, the judging for the GradShow is only for the purpose of identifying award winners. We encourage you to meet with your advisor, committee members, and/or other faculty members in your program to get their feedback on your project. They are the experts on how to improve your scholarship.

Can I give an oral presentation of my Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship work?

No. A 3 minute talk regarding your poster presentation is required; however, there will be no talks or oral presentations in lieu of a poster presentation during the iteration of the GradShow. All Research, Scholarship, and Entrepreneurship submissions must be presented in a poster format.

Is there a limit to how many submissions I can enter?

Yes, we ask that you submit one first-author entry per person.